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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
environment in place. we had cyber hackers come in now up to two years to stool these coins. not only do they steal customer le 100,000 they sto coins from the owner specifically. >> what do you think is the likelihood that these people will ever get their money back? there is no regulation? there are no laws? why should they? dory.t is the fed assumes there's no consumer protection whatsoever and without the consumer protection, these investors could lose everything. most probably they have lost everything. bitcoin itself is untraceable. once these transactions are done, they are irreversible. it is anonymous. it is hard to track down the criminals. it is hard to get the money back. , i'm noto seems to me a lawyer by any means, establishing standing, the most basic legal principle that any suit has to go through, is virtually impossible because of the way bitcoin is designed it so there is no location and place. that is correct. there's no legal structure over the top of it as well as any sort of regulation over it. the chance of getting money back is quite low. what is very interesting
of standards and we also see that there is no control environment in place. we had cyber hackers come in for up to two years to steal these coins buried not only did they still customer coins, but they still 100,000 coins specifically from the owner of gox. >> what is the likelihood that these people will ever get their money back? there is no regulation and there are no safeguards so why should they? >> right, that is the sad story. there is no consumer protection whatsoever. without that protection, these investors could lose everything. most probably they have lost everything. bitcoin itself is not traceable. once these transactions are done, they are irreversible. it's anonymous so clearly is hard to track down the culprits and it is hard to get the money back. seems that the most basic legal principle is virtually impossible because of the weight bitcoin is operating. there is no location in place for such currency. >> that's correct. there is no legal structure over the top of it as well as any sort of regulation over it. the chance of getting money act is quite low. what's interesting ab
the internet as we travel around in the mobile environment. it is critical. nothing works without the internet. they are still transitioning us from voice services or sms on plans. >> on the internet, what is happening with companies like facebook and whatsapp is that people are specializing. whatsapp took what people are doing and specializing to only doing messaging. nothing goes badly. carriers specialize in delivering ip quickly for voice and video services. they start doing fewer things, but doing them better. that is the trend. >> if i were a european carrier, i would say something is going badly when voxer gets all of my customers voice calls and texting and whatsapp -- >> even the carriers would agree with that. >> we are providing more services than before. we provide reliable message delivery, voice and video services, photo and video sending. what you are getting is the data plan. it is a $100 million company. they want the good parts. they want the good parts about the bad parts. that is not a reasonable way to analyze the trade-off. >> what do you think of mark zuckerberg's idea o
preference will be huge. what we're going to get to is that cars will support multiple environments through standard connections. it will likely be wi-fi from what i am reading about this announcement. this is something i think drivers have wanted for a very long time. why did it take so long to get to this point? why did it take so long to get to this deal with apple? on the phonerts makers decided to find an interface which allows the car to remotely control the phone. we are not just talking about rejecting what you see on your smart phone and have a read-only. we are talking about the bidirectional interface which to operatedriver features which are on the phone and use the phone as a computer. this interface needs to be well thought through. it is in the hands of the phone producer to define this interface. on the mutual investigations, i think we have found a very good and very compelling offer. >> final thought. >> it is also interesting that we just saw video showing how this works. they're opening this up to other apps as well. it is an opportunity for other companies likes bod spo
environment. it brings much greater value to our customers. >> there have been very successful tech ipos recently. the environment seems quite good. why not take advantage of that now? >> is more than about the short-term money. about building something great to last year look at our customers. 95,000 customers large and small. we are putting 40,000 unique users on a day. this is what we're focused on. the thing that is whipping in the win for us is the tremendous it -- return on investment our customers are getting. john will be speaking at our momentum conference. 150 countries and on average, they saved $30 per document and have reduced their turnaround time by 21 days. >> it sounds like what you're hinting at is when you're at a public company, there is a pressure to focus on the quarter is focusing on the ground game and not the long ball. is that what happens still at public companies? >> i think it allows our entire leadership team to focus on our customers, and our partners, as public to when you are a company and you focus on quarter after quarter after quarter. we are taking ad
of strategic partners. that is fundamental to our strategy. to thrive in a heterogeneous environment. been successful tech ipos recently. the environment seems good. why not take advantage? >> it is more than about the short-term money. it is about building something great to last. we look at our customers -- have 95,000 customers large and small. we are putting 40,000 unique users on a day. this is what we're focused on. the thing that is really whipping the wind for us is the tremendous return on investment that our customers are getting. john henshaw will be speaking at our momentum conference. he is with hp. save $30erage, they per document and have reduce turnaround time by 21 days. >> it sounds like what you're hinting at is that when you are at a public of any is that there is a pressure to focus on the you areand that focusing on the ground game, not the long ball. is that what happens at public companies? >> it allows our entire leadership team to focus on our customers and on our partners as opposed to when you are a public company and you are focused on quarter after quarter aft
on there. it's a different environment than it was in 2005 or 2006. i would hesitate to say it's over. i think you have to be careful about that. >> whenever i'm in new york, i hear about silicon alley. you hear about, this is the new silicon valley in texas. why is silicon valley continuing to draw the best and brightest? >> is a network effect. if you look at five companies come $5 billion in tech from silicon valley, and you name five in new york, it's hard to find although new york is doing well. it's a network effect. if you're a world-class engineer , where should you go? the overwhelming answer is result,valley, and as a all of the best executives are in silicon valley, or all the ones who know how to scale companies are in silicon valley. there's a predominant amount of money in silicon valley and so forth and the culture itself is very conducive to building companies. all those things combined to make silicon valley a very strong network. it's kind of like hollywood. digital cameras, how hard is it to make a movie? you can make a movie in idaho. but even getting the best key gri
environment. things happen. that tweet has nearly 3 million right now. they won. everyone won. samsung moved the bar forward as for the duration in a stylish way. ellen degeneres is a big social media queen appeared everyone is -- queen now. everyone is a winner. >> such an awesome moment there from the oscars. i thought she did pretty good. what do you think? >> i love her. pepsico was a sponsor. the pizza boxes have coca-cola logos on them. pepsi may not be so happy either. i like her spontaneity and vibe. >> great to see you. thank you so much for joining us. more executive shakeup at microsoft. we are going to talk about the changes and what they might mean nadella new ceo satya when we come back. ♪ >> welcome back to "bloomberg west." satya nadella is shuffling management and effort to reignite growth here at he is putting former political operative mark penn in the role of chief strategy officer. it is the most expensive for nadella yet. he was named ceo just last month. cory johnson is in new york. with me here is ari leavy. who is mark penn? >> a longtime political strategist. he w
environment than it was in 2005 or 2006. i would hesitate to say it is over. >> let me ask you about the bay area. whenever i am here in new york i hear about silicon valley and you hear about the new silicon valley of texas. why is silicon valley continuing brightest, best and or is it? >> i think it is. at the five companies worth more than $5 billion in tech and you will find they all come from silicon valley. and then five in new york. it is a network effect. if you are a world-class engineer, where should you go? the overwhelming answer is silicon valley. and then as a result, the best executives are in silicon valley , the ones who know how to scale companies. is a predominant amount of money. the culture itself is very conducive. all of those things are designed to make it a very strong network effect. it is sort of like hollywood. how hard is it to make a movie. you can make a movie in idaho. grip,etting the best key you will not get someone as good as the guy in hollywood. that is who you are competing with, you start off at a disadvantage. what is the cultural? >> there is just tre
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)